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How to Start a Hat Collection

A hat collection usually comes with a bit of history. 

Hats aren’t just great for wearing, they are also good items to collect. If you want to begin collecting hats, there are a few things to keep in mind. Before you begin purchasing new pieces left and right, it will be best to have a solid understanding of what you are getting into. Here’s some advice for you:

History

True collectors have a real passion for what they are collecting. Regardless if it’s cars, clothing, accessories or stamps, collectors have to know a little bit of history about their niche. Take some time to do some research about hats and their evolving style over the years.

Focus

While there are some folks who just keep putting new items to their collection, this can look disorganized if you don’t have a specific item or style that you want to focus on. Find out what you like best and make that the focal point of your collection. With this technique, you will have a direction and won’t have to purchase everything.

Shop

There are great hats in specialty shops or boutique stores, but the best collectible hats are frequently online. Even rare ones that aren’t typically available in stores and malls can be found online. 

Make friends with other collectors

One of the wonderful things about being a collector is having a team of like-minded folks who share the same enthusiasm. Join online forums or groups for individuals who collect the same things. Being a member of a group will also give you a good platform for selling, trading, and discussing collectibles. 

Display your collection

Naturally, you’re going to want to display your collection! You may need to erect a custom case or closet for your collectibles, particularly if you are collecting pricey pieces. Make a secure space in your home where you can put your collection and begin designing and building.



How to Start a Fine Art Collection 

You can start your art collection by visiting a gallery.

Starting a fine art collection can be scary. it’s vital to invest time realizing what you like, what you plan to spend and figure outplacement in your house.

Crucial Tips for Budding Collectors 

I want to start collecting fine art for my residence. Where do I begin?

Visit auctions, galleries, and museums. Read art books for movements, styles, and artists. Then find places that sell that sort of art, whether it’s an auction house, a gallery, live auction platform, or directly from the artists.

In the end, discovering your own preference and personal style is what matters the most. Know that while some art does appreciate in value, this is not the truth of all art. Collect what you love.

How can I make sure to remain within a budget?

Know that you do not have to buy a whole collection at once. Part of the fun can be gradually building a collection from a host of sources over a period of time. Can’t purchase an original painting from an established artist? Try beginning with a signed print instead or looking for any local emerging artists.

As a new collector, what are some of the benefits of buying art online at auction as opposed to in person?

Convenience. Buying online delivers a way to bid right from home. Also, there are apps that help you bid via a mobile device. If possible, it is recommended that you visit an auction house during the auction preview to view items in person prior to bidding. If that’s not a choice open for you, then call an auction specialist to answer any questions you might have about a specific item, like problems with the condition. 

Being a fine art collector, for monetary reasons or just to have an art collection, can work in your favor when you have the right information to help you.

 



Top Collector Cars to Buy (Part IV)

The British auction house Bonhams sold a 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO for over $38 million in 2014, which is the highest published and confirmed price ever paid for a car. The race car had been handled by legendary driver Stirling Moss at the top of his career. Another 250 GTO purportedly went more than $50 million in a private sale. 

In 2010, the Mullin Automotive Museum bought one of the four incredibly beautiful Bugatti 57SC Atlantic ever built for what a source stated was between $25 million and $45 million. In 2013, a 1954 Mercedes-Benz W196 Silver Arrow sold at an auction in England for over $29 million.

The Bottom Line

Being a collector of high-end cars can take significant investment and comes with petty carrying costs. As preferences and economics alter, what was once worth a king’s ransom could devalue to a mere princely sum, so pick carefully. Italian and Red are usually good bets but be conscious of over-frothy markets. 

For instance, wealthy Japanese buyers couldn’t purchase enough Ferraris in the second half of the 1980s and costs saw an incredible spike and then a bubble. When the Japanese stopped purchasing, those prices dropped by a huge percentage. Buy quality, know your market and demographic factors, and be sure you’re not purchasing while in bubble territory. 

Just because you don’t make six figures to spend, doesn’t mean you can’t have a great classic car. With a little research, these are the top vintage cars you can get for $20,000 or less.

  • 1972–75 BMW 3.0CSL
  • 1997–2004 PORSCHE BOXSTER
  • 1984–93 SALEEN MUSTANG
  • 1996 CHEVROLET CORVETTE GRAND SPORT
  • 2004–07 SUBARU IMPREZA WRX STI
  • 1985–89 TOYOTA MR2
  • 2004–06 DODGE RAM SRT10
  • 1980–86 FORD BRONCO
  • 2008–09 PONTIAC G8 GXP
  • 1994–96 BUICK ROADMASTER ESTATE WAGON


Top Collector Cars to Buy (Part III)

Classic cars can be a bit pricey.

When the Dodge Viper was released in the early 90s, some collectors bought them as investments, thinking that the highly styled sports car with an incredibly potent 400 horsepower would absolutely appreciate in value. But you can pick up a 1993 Viper for under $40,000. 

They cost over $50,000 when brand new. These investors may have like showing off their cars and sometimes blasting down an open road. But with upkeep, inflation, insurance, storage, and opportunity costs, they most surely didn’t make any money.

The same thing happened years earlier when Cadillac stated in ads that the 1976 Eldorado would be the last convertible the brand made. It wasn’t. You can now get well-tended Eldorado convertibles from that vintage for under $25,000. They go for around $11,000 new, which is $47,000 adjusted for inflation.

Affordable Options? Not So Much…

One could argue that the Eldorado and American Viper are at the affordable end of the collectible spectrum, unlike the high-end ones that usually come from Europe. But the same doubt applies to the high-end market. In 1974, Ferrari sold the Dino 246 GT for over 14,000 and the 308 GT4 Dino at a considerably higher price of $22,000. The average price of a 1974 Ferrari 308 GT4 at around $50,000 and a 1974 Ferrari Dino 246 GTS at a clutch the pearls $417,000.

So, what are the best collectible cars? It’s hard to say ultimately. Tastes alter over time, private sales are hard to track, and the high end of the collector’s market centers on extraordinarily rare cars with varying histories. The list of sales that are confirmed to go over $30 million in inflation-adjusted dollars is very short though.

Getting the right financial advisor to assist you with your car collecting budget doesn’t have to be difficult. Every advisor is legally bound to work in your best interests.

 



Top Collector Cars to Buy (Part II)

There are a lot of things that make a car a collectible.

What Makes a Car Collectible

Cars with historical significance, ones that initiated new technology or raised the bar for consumer anticipations can become collectible, particularly if they are beautiful and rare.  Being incredible looking has its advantages. A racing history enhances a car’s allure, as well as association with a respected racer, designer, or builders like Carroll Shelby and Raymond Loewy. 

Prior celebrity ownership can also do the reputation some good, particularly if the person is associated with cars, like James Garner, Steve McQueen, and Paul Newman. The most expensive collectible cars unite these attributes.

As a key rule of thumb, if teenaged boys have their picture on their walls, you’re looking in the right direction. When these young men grow up, they want to buy cars that made them happy and excited in their youth.

Car Investing Risks

Just as most investments have fees, so too does having classic cars. This is actual personal property and you’ll owe taxes on it if you sell at a profit. Is your collectible in horrible condition? Restoring a seven-figure car to good condition, basically considered getting an older car to showroom-new condition using original or precise recreations of paint, parts, and bodywork can go over seven figures. 

Also, there’s continuing storage expenses, maintenance costs, and insurance. Profits from the actual sale of the car will probably have transaction fees, commissions/consignment fees, and transportation costs since chances are you aren’t going to pull a Bugatti behind a U-Haul.

Buying a new or somewhat new car because you believe it will be collectible someday is chancy. Sure, you could get lucky, but chances are you aren’t going to have the opportunity to buy a cheaper car and expect it to be worth thousands in a moderately short period of time.

 



Top Collector Cars to Buy (Part I)

Car collecting is one of the best kind of hobbies one can have. 

Thousands of Americans are interested in car collecting. The British roadster and old muscle car you got in college might still have a place of honor in your garage and used as a weekend cruiser. A restored vintage Volkswagen Beetle or suicide-door Lincoln Continental can be bought for under $20,000, driven lightly for years, and then sold for a (probably modest) profit.

But what about high-end collectibles that go for seven or eight figures? They aren’t for everyone, though high-net-worth folks can use them to make money, increase their holdings, and perhaps even drive from time and time.

The market for classic cars has done far better than other collectibles, such as coins and stamps, over the past decade and has also conquered the broad stock index. The Historic Automobile Group International (HAGI) tracks the collector’s car market with numerous indexes. 

Its largest is the HAGI Top Index, which tracks vintage collectible cars from Bugatti, Porsche, Ferrari, Alfa Romeo, and other brands. The Top Index was over 13.00% year-to-date through August and over 500% the preceding 10 years thanks to rising global wealth chasing a small number of very collectible cars. 

The Car Market

At the high end of the classic car market, the ones that sell for over $1 million, you’ll find somewhat little-known older brands Delahaye and Hispano-Suiza, as well as names that are still famous today, including Jaguar and Rolls-Royce. Even brands not known for top-end exotics can become collectible: Toyota’s beautiful 2000GT, constructed from 1967 to 1970, can get over $1 million at auction. A 1934 Packard Twelve 1108 Dietrich sold for over $3 million and a 1998 McLaren F1 sold for over $13 million. 

The car market reflects the market for art. It’s an investment you enjoy visually and it can also be a currency hedge since cars can be transported to countries with good exchange rates.

 



Why Do Shipwreck Coins Last a Long Time?

Recently, some deep-sea treasure hunters announced the discovery of a shipwreck with over 15 tons of Colonial-era coins worth over $500 million. The crew’s sponsors haven’t told where in the Atlantic they found the cache or which ship had all that loot. Though, they did note that the silver and gold coins were in good condition.

The exact location of the shipwreck is unknown where the coins were found.

What affects the quality of shipwreck coins?

Where the ship goes down and what sort of metal the coins are made of. Coins that have been submerged for hundreds of years can end up being corroded, scratched, worn down, covered by sea life or lime deposits, or destroyed by acid conditions.

The warm waters of the tropics and the Caribbean will create most of the damage since warmer temps accelerate oxidation and corrosion. Also, these waters are the hosts for coral and micro-organisms that can encrust the coins, reducing their value, typically permanently. Cooler northern seas, such as the ones off the coast of England, where some think this treasure was uncovered, are more likely to aid in keeping all types of coins looking good.

Also, conditions on the seafloor make a huge difference. A muddy bottom could help sustain coins by enclosing and protecting them. Though, an environment of swirling sand can wear down markings and designs and cause scratches.

The depth of the wreck also is critical. Deep waters usually have weaker currents. So, the sand at the bottom doesn’t swirl around too much. Though, in some cases, sand can be a good thing. In 1857, The S.S. Central America sank amid calcium carbonate sands that aided in making the surrounding water slightly alkaline, keeping possible damaging acidity at bay. As a result, the ship’s coins were near-pristine when they were found in 1987.

 



Coins on a Gravestone: What it Means

Have you come across a gravestone covered in coins? It’s not unusual while visiting a cemetery to see the stones covered in various coins. So, what’s up with that?

Based on the legend, the coin left is usually on the gravestones of U.S. military veterans. Visitors who want to show their respect leave coins on the headstones in various amounts. It shows their loved ones of the soldier’s family that someone has visited the grave.

Leaving a penny denotes you visited and is thanking the veteran for their service. A nickel signifies you trained at boot camp with the deceased. A dime indicates you served with him or her. A quarter denotes you were with the soldier when they died.

Turns out leaving coins on a grave is a sign of respect.

The beginning of the tradition is up for debate. Though, many folks believe it began in the US during the Vietnam War. America was in a crisis of conscience. Any discussion of the war typically devolved into a more serious discussion about politics. Leaving a coin was a way to say you appreciate the soldier’s service while avoiding an inevitable uncomfortable conversation.

Just a legend?

That’s the theory. Keeping it real, leaving coins on gravestones goes back to just 2009. The money is typically collected and donated to the cemetery’s upkeep and possible burial costs.

But humans have left tributes and artifacts at gravesites for hundreds of years. Based on Greek mythology, during the Roman empire, fellow soldiers would put a coin into the mouth of a fallen soldier to make sure they could cross the River Styx into the afterlife.

However, one United States tradition is the leaving of “challenge coins” on military headstones by fellow veterans. These coins typically have the emblem of the deceased’s military company or unit. Fellow soldiers leave them to pay tribute to them and their family members.




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